Blog Action Day, Hobbits, Earthships… more geeky interests per post than the law allows!

On this, Blog Action Day, the topic is the Environment. Of course, we’re supposed to talk about the real life environment, but there are some lessons that we take from fiction.
Namely, hobbits.
I’ve been playing a lot of Lord of the Rings Online, and during that time I’ve been spending a fair amount of time in the area of the game built to represent the Shire. This has been a kind of geeky paradise for me, because I love love love Tolkien’s work and seeing it realized more fully in a virtual setting is just tons of fun.
But while I’m geeking out, I’m looking at the hobbit-houses in the game and thinking “man… wouldn’t it be great if you could live in a house like that? Forget about how awesome it would be… just think of the savings on heating and cooling… look at the profile of the thing… it’s just such an excellent DESIGN.”
So… half geek and half responsible eco-parent. Okay. Fine.
Now, we can’t bulldoze all the houses and buildings that are out there, of course, but how excellent would it be if someone out there was at least trying to provide a solution like this for NEW housing. If you can’t get the government to do a damned thing about Global Warming, make changes on a personal level, right?
Personally, I want a real, beautiful hobbit hold, but if not that, maybe Earthship?
(Thanks to the WoW Insider poster that linked to this earlier.)

6 Replies to “Blog Action Day, Hobbits, Earthships… more geeky interests per post than the law allows!”

  1. Or you would be the freaky guy in the neighborhood pooping in your own back yard and then using it to fertilize your garden – now that is giving back! Kate how do you feel about moving in with that guy??

  2. As I have already explained to Kate, I really don’t care for the earthship.
    Or the house of straw.
    Hobbit holes. With 801.2g broadband wifi and a dedicated gaming room and home theatre.
    Or, to put it classically:
    “Not a nasty, dirty, wet hole, filled with the ends of worms and an oozy smell, nor yet a dry, bare, sandy hole with nothing in it to sit down on or to eat: it was a hobbit-hole, and that means comfort.”

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